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Title

e of and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large U.S. Sample of HIV-infected Adults in Care, 2007-2008.

Authors

Beer L, Heffelfinger J, Frazier E, Mattson C, Roter B, Barash E, Buskin S, Rime T, Valverde E.

Network Affiliation

Other

Organization

 

Journal Name

Open AIDS J.

Publication Date

6/1/2012

PubMed Search

 

Link to full-text

 

PMID

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the cornerstone of HIV clinical care and is increasingly recognized as a key component of HIV prevention. However, the benefits of ART can be realized only if HIV-infected persons maintain high levels of adherence.

METHODS:

We present interview data (collected from June 2007 through September 2008) from a national HIV surveillance system in the United States-the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP)-to describe persons taking ART. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess behavioral, sociodemographic, and medication regimen factors associated with three measures that capture different dimensions of nonadherence to ART: dose, schedule, and instruction.

RESULTS:

The use of ART among HIV-infected adults in care was high (85%), but adherence to ART was suboptimal and varied across the three measures of nonadherence. Of MMP participants currently taking ART, the following reported nonadherence during the past 48 hours: 13% to dose, 27% to schedule, and 30% to instruction. The determinants of the three measures also varied, although younger age and binge drinking were associated with all aspects of nonadherence.

Keywords

 

Topic

Adherence; Adolescents/Youth; Behavior; Substance Abuse

Attachments

Created at 11/2/2012 10:58 AM by Davis, Gregory P
Last modified at 11/2/2012 10:58 AM by Davis, Gregory P