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Title

HIV Among Indigenous peoples: A Review of the Literature on HIV-Related Behaviour Since the Beginning of the Epidemic.

Authors

J. Negin, C. Aspin, T. Gadsden, C. Reading

Network Affiliation

Other

Organization

 

Journal Name

AIDS and Behavior

Publication Date

3/1/2015

PubMed Search

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25731659

Link to full-text

 

PMID

25731659

Abstract

​From the early days of the HIV epidemic, Indigenous peoples were identified as a population group that experiences social and economic determinants-including colonialism and racism-that increase exposure to HIV. There are now substantial disparities in HIV rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in some countries. We conducted a comprehensive literature review to assess the evidence on HIV-related behaviors and determinants in four countries-Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States-in which Indigenous peoples share important features of colonization and marginalization. We identified 107 articles over more than 20 years. The review highlights the determinants of HIV-related behaviors including domestic violence, stigma and discrimination, and injecting drug use. Many of the factors associated with HIV risk also contribute to mistrust of health services, which in turn contributes to poor HIV and health outcomes among Indigenous peoples.

Keywords

 

Topic

Behavior; Racial Disparities; Substance Abuse; Stigma

Attachments

Created at 3/6/2015 1:11 PM by Davis, Gregory P
Last modified at 3/6/2015 1:11 PM by Davis, Gregory P