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Title

Differences in HIV risk behaviors among people who inject drugs by gender and sexual orientation, San Francisco, 2012.

Authors

H. Jin, E. Huriaux, E. Loughran, et al.

Network Affiliation

Other

Organization

 

Journal Name

Drug Alcohol Depend.

Publication Date

12/1/2014

PubMed Search

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25456328

Link to full-text

 

PMID

25456328

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sharing of drug injection equipment is a well-established risk factor for the transmission of viral infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, there are multiple mechanisms through which people who inject drugs (PWID) can acquire and transmit HIV. Differences in drug using and sexual behaviors among heterosexual males, males who have sex with males (MSM), and females who inject drugs may explain health disparities.

METHODS:

Data were collected in San Francisco by the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) System of PWID in 2012, and were analyzed to compare the sexual behaviors, drug use behaviors, and prevalence of viral infections among heterosexual males, MSM, and females.

RESULTS:

Using a weighted analysis for the RDS sampling design, we estimate that 3.7% of heterosexual males who inject drugs, 24.0% of MSM, and 13.0% of females who inject drugs are living with HIV. Females and heterosexual males primarily injected heroin, while MSM primarily injected methamphetamine. MSM were most likely to have received goods or money for sex and have unprotected intercourse.

CONCLUSION:

These data demonstrate differences in risk behaviors and prevalence of viral infections among heterosexual males, MSM, and females. The results also suggest that public health programs prioritizing the different populations of PWID are necessary.

Keywords

 

Topic

Behavior; MSM; Substance Abuse; Women

Attachments

Created at 12/5/2014 10:23 AM by Davis, Gregory P
Last modified at 12/5/2014 10:23 AM by Davis, Gregory P